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AirAux AA-DH1 – The new 50-watt speaker is pretty cool!

AirAux AA-DH1 – The new 50-watt speaker is pretty cool!

The pre-order sale has started, you can save 8 thousand!

AirAux AA-DH1 - The new 50-watt speaker is pretty cool!

AirAux, a sub-brand of Blitzwolf. We get fucking gadgets under the brand name, speakers, headphones and earphones, soundbars, so devices that we can use to listen to music, or even improve the sound of the TV. For this reason, it is not surprising that the latest AirAux has also become a sound generator, namely a rather flashy, portable, battery-powered, 50-watt speaker.

AirAux AA-DH1 - The new 50-watt speaker is pretty cool! 1

Two 25-watt radiators work in the structure, of course we get bass emphasis, and there is also a TWS function, with which we can pair two speakers to get a strong stereo effect, now at 100 watts. The speaker has a 4500 mAh battery, which allows 4 hours of music playback and 10 days of standby mode after 30 hours of charging.

AirAux AA-DH1 - The new 50-watt speaker is pretty cool! 2

The AirAux AA-DH1 is a real party speaker. It has IPX5 water protection, which means splashing water won't damage it. This is not a bad feature at a party, but it is even better that there are RGB lights and light effects. You can send music to the speaker in four ways, you can use a Bluetooth connection, or you can insert a cable with a jack end, a USB data carrier or a memory card.

AirAux AA-DH1 - The new 50-watt speaker is pretty cool! 3

All in all, the stuff seems quite sophisticated, and the price is right, especially in the introductory sale. So, if you would buy it, be one of the first 100 customers and get it for HUF 49 here:

AirAux AA-DH1 Bluetooth speaker

You can find the introductory promotion page here:

AirAux AA-DH1 Introductory sale description

About the Author

s3nki

Owner of the HOC.hu website. He is the author of hundreds of articles and thousands of news. In addition to various online interfaces, he has written for Chip Magazine and also for the PC Guru. For a time, he ran his own PC shop, working for years as a store manager, service manager, system administrator in addition to journalism.